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have former player and wade davis, former player. atlanta here in new york respectively. welcome to both of you. wade davis, let me begin with you. this is personal. you played for the titans and -- >> i played cornerback. >> same position. when you heart his remarks, did it surprise you, his tone? >> for did sort of surprise me. i was deeply saddened. i thought we moved a little further ahead in the conversation. i thought that guys would think a little bit before they spoke. i think the fact that he was talking to a comedian, he was trying to be a little funny. it came out horrific and inflammatoryy and i believe he understands the harm his words caused. >> wade davis, this is personal for you because you came out officially in a publication in june of last year. you finished playing back in 2004. why didn't you come out while you were playing? >> i didn't come out because i grew up with the ideology that i could never be a gay athlete from the time i was 7 years old plag playing a game of football. i thought my sexuality and the game of football didn't mix. i'm trying now to t
to atlanta for a very special program with miss king at the famed ebenezer baptist church, the church that was home base for dr. king during much of the civil rights movement. a conversation which would turn out to be one of her last on national television. we're glad you could join us to wrap up this 10th anniversary week with a conversation with coretta scott king, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we kick off our second season in 2005, we could think of no better way to celebrate than by paying a visit to coretta scott king at atlanta's iconic ebenezer baptist church. we traveled to atlanta for a special program with mrs. king, taped in front of
as a young fellow growing up in atlanta georgia my parents didn't have an answer. it became kind of a quest to find out about it in the sense that there was enormous power and that would change the direction of my life. when i wasn't looking for it to happen. c-span: how many of your years did you think about this? >> guest: i started after i got into a book career in the late 70's after magazine journalism. i wanted to write about this period because i hadn't answered the question what is it made of and i thought in 1981 with what was proposed to be a three year history of the teen years and it's now been 16 years and i've done it in two volumes is now projected to be a trilogy or will be a trilogy after i finish it but i would have 20 years. definitely turning into my life work but i'm thankful for the privilege of it. c-span: the first book, parting the waters, 1,056 pages. this but there are 546 pages. what's been your approach? >> guest: to do it in storytelling. one of the reasons i wanted to do it is i knew this had an enormous impact like the construction period in the years before
students met in atlanta to push a global movement to end it. jim clancy tells us about their cause. >> reporter: more than 60,000 young christians from around the country and around the world held candles aloft in the frosty air. their own faces shined back at them from a massive cube set up outside the georgia dome. faces of those who have pledged to light up the world and put an end to human trafficking in their lifetimes. >> slavery is trapped in dark places all over the world. it's trapped here in atlanta. in the shadows. it's in the shadows in mumbai india. it's in the shadows in cam bode yo. it's in the shadows around the world in brothels and factories. 60,000 students are going to shine a light on slavery. >> reporter: for many a journey of the christian faith one that brings them to the passion conference to worship, pray, and learn. for the past two years, they've been focusing on the unholy scourge of sexual slavery and forced labor. the 27 million victims, the billions of dollars churned out, by robbing men, women, and children of their freedom. these young men and wome
: spelman college was in atlanta, and yet even though atlanta is seen certainly today as one of the less racist spots in the south, in fact, atlanta was almost totally segregated when howard arrived at pellman. by -- spelman. by the way, he never, he made sure that people never thought that he took a job at an all-black women's college because he was committed to the black struggle. we're talking about 1956 when the black struggle was just beginning. and though howard did care about black rights, he was not yet an activist in behalf of those rights. but in fairly short order, he and his wife roz both became very active. i mean, his students -- the first white women came a little bit after howard's arrival. and even then very few of them. and young black women, many of whom had been brought up in rural areas, they were slightly stunned at this white teacher. there were few other white members of the spelman fact facy faculty -- faculty. but howard was a genius of a teacher. he was very inform formal, very -- informal, very easy going. he prided himself on being good at conversation and on
are following reports about a shooting at a school in atlanta. keith russell has the latest from the news4 live desk. keith? >> pat, the reports first started coming in around 2:30 this afternoon. let's show you video just in. firefighters have confirmed a 14-year-old was shot in the head at a middle school in atlanta's south side. the school says the student was alert and breathing when taken to the hospital. a teacher was also hurt, but from what we know, she was not shot. the school said it's possible the teacher was trampled in the confusion after the shooting. we're told the shooting happened outside the school building. there's a heavy police presence right now. the suspected gunman is a student. police say the other students at the school are safe and they were dismissed on too many just a few minutes ago. we'll keep you posted on this store. at the live desk, keith rustle, news4. >>> hours in the hot seat as senators grilled chuck hagel in his bid to become the next defense secretary. the former senator from nebraska was questioned on several positions, including controversial topics. d
was in atlanta and even though it is seen today as one of the less racist spots in the south, in effect atlanta was almost totally segregated when howard arrived at spellman, but by the way, she made sure that people never thought that he took a job at an all black women's college because he was committed to the black struggle. but it was just beginning and to know how word did care about black rights he wasn't in activist on behalf of those rights. in fairly short order she and his wife both became very active the first white women came a little bit our after his arrival and even then a very few of them young black women many of whom had been part of the rural areas, they were slightly stunned at this white teacher and there were fewer other members of this bill my faculty. but howard was a genius of a teacher. she was very informal, very easygoing fox, he prided himself on a conversation and entertaining other points of view. he didn't see himself as a lecturer. someone was handing down the truth to the enlarged. securely on created a very warm give-and-take in the classroom to get to the act
and snowing across parts of michigan and wisconsin. the biggest threat of severe weather is still from atlanta and southeast ward. that's where the tornado potentially is right now and maybe even up into the piedmont of north carolina and virginia. the big story is how all of this happened. atlanta, 70 degrees today, now down to 63, as miguel said. it is is cooling down. it's 10 degrees below zero in minot, north dakota. with windchill and heat index, it's even more sublime than that. topeka kansas has gone down 38 degrees where philadelphia was up. by this morning the cold air down in past the 24 hours and atlanta is getting cooler. st. louis is 34 degrees cooler than it was. part of the up and down of the jet stream is the energy between the cold and the warm. it is 80 and the feels like temperature in key west, it feels like 806789 the feels like wind temperature in minot is a negative 34. that's 114 degrees difference across the continental u.s., wolf. >> even here in the nation's capital, washington, d.c., was in the 20s and got in the 50s and 60s. it's going up and down. what's happening
. >> reporter: gun shows near orlando and atlanta drew huge crowds this weekend, but the decision to hold a gun collector's show near newtown, connecticut, where the school shootings occurred, drew mixed reactions. >> it seems insensitive to have the event continue. >> i believe that they should have the gun show. >> reporter: later this month, vice president biden's gun violence task force, formed in response to the newtown shootings, is expected to give its recommendations, which could involve much more than just a ban on assault weapons and high-capacity clips. the "washington post" reports the group could also include stiffer penalties for carrying guns near schools or giving them to minors, track gun movement and sales and strengthen mental health and background investigations. >> the more constructive conversation is going to be around background checks and what we can do to keep guns out of the hands of dangerous people. >> reporter: the report also claims the white house may be looking for ways to work around the nra, but in nbc's "meet the press" today, republican senate leader mitch m
francisco. >>> next sunday seattle visits the top seeded atlanta falcons and houston will be at new england. let's take to it college football. at the go code.com bowl arkansas state took the lead just before halftime. held on for 17-13 victory there. tonight it is the bcs national championship game with number one notre dame facing number two alabama. there will be a national hockey season this year. the league and the players union announced a deal to end the lockout and play a shortened season starting neck week. the tournament of champions pga tour will try again today to play some golf. wind gusts and rain in hawaii have delayed the start for three days in a row. >>> just ahead marijuana rumors swirl around a teen pop star and gerard depardieu gets comfy in his new homeland. plus find out where honey boo's money is going now that her family is raking in the big bucks. you're watching "early today." >>> welcome back on this monday morning. the northwest getting it pretty good. some rain. also watching snow levels on the rise as warmer air moves in, avalanche watches in effect for the ol
freezing, a normal temperature there. toward atlanta, a partly cloudy day. focus" only on the link tv. >> a reminder now of the top stories -- at least 230 people have died in a fire at night club in southern brazil. witnesses say musicians that off fireworks on stage and some victims were trampled to death in the panic to escape. in egypt, six people had died in violence during funerals for the more than 30 people killed in clashes on saturday. french and forces in mali fighting against the rebels are on the outskirts of the city of timbuktu. our correspondent is traveling with the french military on the road to timbuktu. >> french forces are amassing in this depot just to the southwest of timbuktu. we have seen troops from all here as well, preparing weaponry and assembling heavy guns. these are the strongest signals we have had get that the final event on timbuktu is imminent. the strategy with each town along the road has been the same -- the troops from mali go in first, followed by the french. we want to create the impression this is the government retaking town rather than a fo
of atlanta. a 14-year-old student is shot at price middle school on the south side of the city. the child is breathing and treated at a local hospital. a teacher is injured, possibly trampled in the confusion. police have a suspect in custody. clearly many unanswered questions in the early investigation but a recent in a rash of school shootings that are all putting pressure on congress to act. and a new tactic adding to that pressure, economic shaming. former investment banker and current chicago mayor emanuel is leading advocates to pressure banks to divest from gun manufacturers, persuaded a $5 million pension fund in chicago to divest and now california's fund for teachers frozen or divested investments in gun makers. philadelphia mayor nutter compares the strategy to the one used to pressure company that is did business with the apartheid government of south africa. our next guest shining a light on the dirty dozen, 12 big corporate investors that back the gun industry. please welcome current public advocate for city of new york, bill deblazio. how are you? >> great. thank you. >> ec
. for you who are out on the front lines, doesn't that frustrate you? >> absolutely. i heard about atlanta. >> jennifer: a middle school in atlanta, another shooting today. >> and a young woman who was in president obama's inauguration was shot. >> jennifer: yes. >> we got to stop it. we have to stop it. it is frustrating, and i've been talking--i'm hoping that urban and suburban i hope we can get past the rhetoric and get to doing something about gun violence in this toronto. >> jennifer: after yesterday's town hall you said there is a political window, and now is the time to change gun laws. do you think that can actually happen when one side has always been so successful, and frankly so stubborn? >> i think it can happen. i do i do. it's not going to be easy. you always hope that minds will prevail. i don't think anybody wants anybody to die. when i've been in the room, if i cannous this phrase, on the other side, i've been able to get them to focus on what we're here for. that is to save young people's lives. whether it be sandy hook, chicago, san francisco or oakland, i think that com
is in the super bowl is the ravens who beat atlanta. and the 49ers. i used to be a 49ers fan when joe montana was there. i have to support the ravens because they are our sister city. atlanta -- >> what about the people from baltimore who don't want any bandwagon hoppers? >> i'm not bandwagon hopper i'm just being practical. i'm a supporter, when they win, lose, i don't care about that. i have a responsibility to bring them together. i predict the rave lens beat the 49ers. >> you heard it here first from marion barry. you think it is going to be a stormy monday for the 49ers. >> can i sing? ♪ stormy monday ♪ tuesday is just as bad ♪ oh they call this stormy monday ♪ ♪ and tuesday is just so bad ♪ then come friday ♪ and things are so so sad >> that's going to be for the 49ers on monday. councilman barry, thanks for tackling a lot of topics with us. >> i have been in the business 31 years and very familiar with the budget. i'm a budget expert. 16 years of mayor. finance expert. and so -- a lot of people think i'm whistling in the dark. >> we heard you loud and clear. >> i guarante
of the hardest-hit spots was adairsville, georgia, 60 miles north of atlanta. one person there died as did a man in pntennessee. let's get right to miguel marquez. miguel, good morning. >> reporter: good morning there, soledad. the person who died here in adairsville died fairly close to where we were standing right now. he was in a manufactured home and a tree killed him. this storm packed a thousand-mile punch. >> we could see circulation in the clouds. >> reporter: a reporter from atlanta affiliate wsb caught one twister as it touched down. >> slashing toward i-75. again, a tornado -- >> reporter: in its path, utter destruction. >> this is main street in adairsville, georgia. this is exactly where that tornado hit. you can see devastation on that side of the street, the trucks completely destroyed here. and on this side was a normal day of work here at the plant where they make parts for tractors. complete devastation. 50 to 100 people working here today, all of them fine. across this entire area, trucks, everythin everything, shredded. at the plant justin carnes and his fellow employees took
. martha: oh, boy. what a scary story from that poor woman. reporter paul milican from waga in atlanta has more from gordon county, georgia. >> we are in is a nor have -- sonoraville, georgia which got hit hard behind me. tough to imagine what this used to be. this was a towing company and this was the sign for it right here, after for theable towing. the owners are here and as you can imagine they're in shock. this is one of the most incredible things i have ever seen. this used to be carpet. you see it over there, it was completely shredded by the tornado. there are also of course pieces of cars, there are pieces of houses. looked like this right here was a christmas ornament which is sitting on the grass. who knows where that came from. we talked to the owners who are here right now. this is their first time looking at the devastation. they say as you can imagine, they're in shock. martha: thanks to paul from waga in atlanta. bill: what a remarkable to think it is january and we're talking about tornados. martha: so true. bill: new signs of volatility in the american job market. these a
at a middle school in atlanta. that's straight ahead here in "the situation room." >>> the senate has just followed the house of representatives in the past legislation extending the nation's debt ceiling, this time at least until may 19th. but for practical purposes, probably a few months longer than that. the vote in the senate, 64-34. the bill passed the house next week and will sign it into law. there will be an increase in the nation's debt limit, at least for the next few months. they will battle over this later down the road. other news we're following, three stories involving high-profile shootings at a time when the nation is struggling with the issue of guns. lisa sylvester is monitoring that. some of the other top stories in "the situation room." lisa, what's the latest? >> at least one person has been shot at a middle school in atlanta. the victim was conscious and breathing when taken to a local hospital. the suspected gunman is believed to be a student and is in custody. >>> police outside of dallas are investigating the shooting of a prosecutor. district attorney mark haas w
limping. so many questions today. oh, yeah, by the way, seattle won and they will play atlanta next weekend. >>> all right. the baltimore ravens are also moving on in the afc playoffs. they beat the indianapolis colts 24-9 on sunday. it was the last home game for the soon to be retired ray lewis. joe flacco threw down two touchdown passes including one to antwon bolden who set a franchise record. the ravens will meet peyton manning and the denver broncos next sunday. >>> the waiting is over. tonight in south florida the top ranked fighting irish of notre dame tangle with second ranked alabama for the bcs title. notre dame has a 5-1 all-time record against alabama. these two teams haven't faced each other on the gridiron since 1987. each has nine national titles. kickoff is 8:30 eastern. >> that's pretty late. >> are you watching the game? >> i am. >> you're wearing green today. you're clearly siding with the irish today. >>> there is some other sports news, believe it or not. the lockout, the nhl lockout that put the hockey season on ice could soon be over. they reached a tentative
anything. >> centers for disease controls, right, in atlanta, studied this, if there was anything gun law that helped reduce gun violence and they came up with? >> nothing. >> zero. it's all a mixed bag. if you ban things the bad guys know. >> bill: 300 million guns on the streets of america right now. the bad guys are going to find them, ookay? that's the tway. >> makes no difference. other countries, too. >> bill: i favor though background checks and the government knowing who has an ar. i think that's just sane. you oppose? >> i don't know where to draw the line. the government messes up the background checks. they leave people's names out. you say ar. how about another kind of gun. >> i say just a semiautomatic rifles. the ones with the big clips. i think they got to register. >> am i reasonable? >> it seems reasonable to me to ban the big clips, too. it's just a anyone can make one. >> the background checks might. the government collecting this information. >> it's not going to stop another new town shooting. >> doesn't mean you can do this. when we come right back, will president ob
in the middle of a lot of civil-rights politics? >> guest: in atlanta, and even though atlantis is seen certainly today as one of the less racist spots in the son of, in fact it was almost totally segregated when he arrived. but, by the way, he made sure that people never thought that he took a job that an all-black women's college because he was committed to the black struggle. we're talking about 1956 when the black struggle was just beginning. and though howard did care about black rights, he was not yet an activist on behalf of those rights. but in fairly short order he and his wife became very active. i mean, his students, the first white women came of little bit after howard's arrival and even then very few. dion, black women, many of whom have been brought up in rural areas, they were slightly stunned at this white teacher. there were few other white members, but howard was a genius of -- teacher. very informal, very easygoing. he prided himself on being good at conversation and at entertaining other points of view. he did the see himself as a lecturer, someone who was handing do
on the nashville paper, later with "the new york times," the editor of the "atlanta constitution." bill kovich. >> as a very careful observer of the times, you live through it and you reported about it, how did your -- tell me who things, what was the biggest surprise you discovered, and how did you change your mind based on your research? >> what was the biggest surprise and how did i change my mind? i think the biggest surprise was that j. edgar hoover and his fbi's campaign to destroy king politically, at least, was far more vicious, was far more relentless, and cruel, and i could imagine that public officials in the united states would do. how did i come to that conclusion? after a two or three year battle with the fbi and with my friends in the lbj library, part of the national archives, i was finally able to put together a mosaic of hundreds of fbi memos that went to the president. i saw how the president reacted to them, and didn't react to them. and even though great reporters have covered this story well, starting in '75 with the church hearings, i was appalled about that, and i don't
on camera. miguel marquez has that part of our story. >> reporter: a reporter from atlanta affiliate wsb caught one twister as it touched down. >> toward i-75. again a tornado -- >> reporter: in its path, utter destruction. this is main street in adairsville, georgia. you can see the back side of the street trucks completely destroyed own an this side a normal day of work at the daiqui plant, they come here to make parts for tractors, complete devastation, 50 to 100 people working here today, and across this entire area, trucks, everything, shredded. at the plant, justin carnes and his fellow employees took refuge in the bathroom. what did it sound like? >> walls shaking, everything was shaking. >> pressure. >> there was like a pressure on my ears, a high-pitched whistling sound, hurt my ears really bad. >> reporter: the thousand-mile-long storm set off tornados in six states from missouri to georgia, leaving massive damage and creating drastic temperature changes. in nashville, one man died when a tree fell on his home. >> it was a bad site, tree fell like right on it. >> reporter: in m
the country. washington, mostly sunny, 52. turning cloudy in atlanta, 50. sun and clouds in st. louis, 49 degrees. partly cloudy in denver, 53. rain in seattle, 46 degrees. >>> the consumer electronic show opens today in las vegas. from huge high-def tvs to cutting edge playsets, it's a showcase of the latest gadgets. here's a sneak peek. >> reporter: crews are working to transform close to two million square feet at the las vegas convention center into a more than 40-year-old tech tradition. the consumer electronics show. >> it's the center of the digital universe. >> reporter: jim berry has helped promote the annual convention for the past 14 years and says this year's "it" product just may be the ultra h.d. television with four times the amount of pickles as regular h.d. tvs. >> they're where high-definition sets were 15 years ago, $10,000 and up. remember, now you can walk into a store and buy a high-definition set for a couple hundred bucks. >> reporter: while computers aren't getting as much attention as previous years, mobile accessories are becoming more popula
an intruder. her husband is calling her a hero this morning. carrie cavanaugh of wusb in atlanta tells us what happened. >> my wife is a hero. she protected her kids. she did what she was supposed to do as a responsible, prepared gun owner. >> reporter: donnie herman was on the phone with his wife as an intruder was breaking into their home. walton county sheriff's deputies say thmother works from the home on henderson ridge drive. her 9-year-old twins didn't have school. around noon, a strange man arrived at the door. deputies say he began continuously ringing bell. when no one responded, he grabbed a crowbar from his truck and pried his way in. that's when the mother grabbed her kids, her gun, and hid in a crawl space. >> the perpetrator opens that door. of course, at that time, he's staring at her, her two children, and a .38 revolver. >> reporter: sheriff joe chapman says the woman began firing all six rounds, hitting the suspect in the face and neck five times. >> she starts yelling at him, stay down or i'm going to shoot you again. that's when she gets her two children out of the crawl s
mean, we have not been building them for 50 years. for example, in atlanta, only 35% of the people who want to live in urban communities that are walkable can afford -- can find them and afford to live them. it is described as the next great economic boom. they have to sell houses first; right? get out of the old house, but they would rather be in the city, and the ones of means, of course, have disposable income, no kids, exactly the kind of customers you want for your stores and part of your tax base in the city. joe courtright, also based in portland, has done a lot of research into what that means. he took walk score, based in seattle. do you know about walk score? raise your hand if you know about walk score. pretty much most of you. that rates each address in the world, i guess america, i don't know. it's google maps data in terms of walk about. joe did a study finding that -- depends what city you're in, but every walk score point is worth, on average, out of a hundred, worth $2,000. every point on a hundred-point scale, which figures in dc an empty lot in the city is worth $200
wednesday morning the tornado touched down in adairsville, 60 miles north of atlanta. it ripped homes to shreds. >> i was so scared. it just picked me up and fling me three times. one man died when a tree fell on his home. >> there was no warning from the sirens, no wag. >> reporter: juanita carter dove into the bathtub to take cover as her house collapsed around her. >> i was glad my kids weren't in home, they were in school. >> reporter: they estimated the cloud as a quarter mile wide and touched down and stayed on the ground for a full two miles. >> this [ bleep ] on get back in here. >> reporter: overturned and tossed about vehicles and heavy tractor trailers were no match for the high winds, as many as 100 vehicles were flipped. that threw your truck about 250 feet there? >> evidently. wrapped it all in the power lines and i guess slammed it down. >> reporter: a state of emergency has been declared in the county that we're in this morning, as well as another county a little to the north. more than 6,500 power customers across the state of georgia are still in t
the tornado touched down here in adairsville, 60 miles north of atlanta. it tore off parts of a manufacturing plant and ripped homes to shreds. >> i was so scared. it picked me up and flinged me three times. >> reporter: one man died when a tree crushed his home. at least nine people were injured. juanita carter dove into the bathtub to take cover as the structure of her cinder block house collapsed around her. >> i'm glad my kids weren't home and they were in school. >> reporter: chief jones said they estimated it as a quarter mile wide and staid on the ground for a full two miles. overturned 57bds tossed about vehicles and even heavy tractor-trailers were no match for the high winds. as many as 100 vehicles were flipped. >> that through your vehicle about 150 feet there? >> evidently. wrapped it all in the power lines and i guess slammed it down. >> reporter: a state of emergency has been declared in the county that we're in this morning as well atz another county further to the north. more than 6,500 power customers across the state of georgia are still in the dark this morning. >> terrell
that fire to the area, but the lobby did suffer some water damage. georgia, part of a term until at atlanta's heart field jackson airport evacuated after a passenger bag began ticking. a concerned employee called in the bomb squad for a closer look, turns out it was a false alarm. the passenger had a toothbrush in their bag, a battery operated set off and making this noise. >> the terminal reopened and passenger made her flight. authorities say the worker did the right thing by calling for help. california, a winter tradition lives on in san francisco. more than two dozen brave souls endured 49 degrees water swimming from alcatraz island to san francisco's aquatic park. most wore wet suits for warmth except for one who donned nothing, but his speedo. brrr. if you've filled up your car or truck tank recently, you've probably noticed gas surprises gradually going higher and 2013 could be a pricey year at the bump. anchor of bulls and bear, brenda buttner has the details. >> shannon, watch out, that price at the pump may be driving higher. just as the ball is dropping for 2013, prices were ris
. is it unusual? >> that's all -- i'll answer that one. >> safer ground. go for it. >> we will be 70 in atlanta thursday in to friday but the west taking the brunt of it. this is a shift in the jet stream where it's cold in the west, warm in the east and will change. don't get used to it. rain and snow across the rockies in to the cascades. could see 14 inches of snow in some spots. good snow for skiers, i guess. not good to travel through it as a driver. know about this coming. there's rain coming to texas, as well. taking the rain. still getting over the drought down here to the south and gets up to the red river and some good news tuesday in to wednesday and the forecast is some of these areas, all red, four to six inches of rain across the area. that desperately needs it. could see severe weather threat, maybe a rain shower or two to maybe make a hailstone or two. other than that, i know what you want to see. raining for the big game tonight and probably not. should recalls right now. by 8:00, they calm down and a beautiful night miami, florida. >> the big game, the big game. hockey, none b
. and nashville, going up to 55 tuesday. 47 today. atlanta, close to 60 on sunday. washington, d.c., average of 43 this time of year. it would be above average as you end your weekend. something to look forward to maybe. we fly across the nation. l.a. 65 today. ft. collins, 39. >> this weather report brought to you by usaa. dan and bianna? >> thank you, ginger. >>> coming up on "gma," up close and personal with a hungry polar bear. we'll hear from the cameraman who took these pictures. >>> and could it be tv's new odd couple? kelsey grammer appears to return to primetime. his co-star, highly unlikely. not that dog, by the way. we'll be back with the details after a quick break. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. i can brew my coffee just the way i love it. how do you do that? inside the brewer, there's th
are afraid that the government is coming for their guns. in atlanta, the guns are flying off the shelves. savannah, buying anything gun related. in utah, the city is encouraging people to arm themselves and talking about giving teachers hand gun training. and the web site house of guns says one million ar 15 magazines are on back order. people want to protect themselves. >> gretchen: they do. i think you can take the conversation way too far to say okay, should we have a little bit more gun control or take your guns away? i think that's a totally different discussion. one thing i hope they coo in this gun discussion is to have a discussion about the other issues as to how we've come to this place, like video games, like mental health, like all these other things that affect the culture that we currently find ourselves in. >> brian: because when you talk about tucson, aurora and tucson, the guys were crazy and the people knew and didn't act. they're focusing on the amount of carnage instead of the guys showing up armed. >> steve: in russia, the information agency, they say the quote, amer
localize it in many other places. they could do in atlanta and miami. those of you who read the i.h.. the know sometimes it is localized. so "the times" is trying to survive and there are many ways it might survive. they issue of course extremely optimistic financial reports it will get better and it will get better. around that leads me to my final sentence which is to quote lord northcliffe who owned "the london times" and "the daily mail". and he said "somewhere someone is trying to suppress the real story, the rest is advertising"" and what i tried to do in my book was separate the real story from advertising. thank you. [applause] >> we are going to have a q&a and the c-span person is going to walk around with that instead of me and he wants to catch you, so don't start talking until he gets there. so if you want to be on c-span, raise your hand. would anybody like to ask me a question or talk about something? oh, come on. does anyone want to say something? >> go ahead. >> i've read that i guess maybe it's common knowledge that when rupert murdoch purchased the "wall street j
? >> guest: there is many different. the papers of boston in the papers of atlanta and the papers in so many different places, hundreds of archives around the world. i found king papers in india. so you bring them all together and you decide how to publish them and make them available to people. that has been my job for the last 25 years. >> host: you are a historian and your african-american. i can see your interest. what really brought you to want to do this? coretta his wife, his widow asked you about what was her motivation for wanting to do at? >> guest: i think i didn't want to not do it. i think it was more -- i had a lot of doubts because i didn't know of wanted to devote the rest of my career to doing this. >> host: what did she say to you? how did she ask you? >> guest: she asked whether i would be interested in actually when we first talked on that phonecall i said aren't there other people who have done more were? my work was on the grassroots struggle and not so much on king's role. i never have really written much about king apart from the movement. so but then she came out and
? >> guest: the peepers i'm editing, the papers at boston, the peepers and atlanta, the papers and so many different places, hundreds of archives are none of the world. i've gone -- i have papers in india. so we bring them all together and we decide how to publish them and make them available to people. that's been my job for the last 25 years. >> host: ury history in coming your african-american. i can see an interest. what brought you to want to do this? coretta asked you but what was your motivation for wanting to do it? >> guest: i think i didn't want to not do it. i didn't know wanted to devote the rest of my career to do this. >> host: how did she ask? >> guest: she asked are you interested and when we first talked people that have done work really on the grassroots dimension of the struggle not so much on the role i never knew much about him apart from the movement. so, but then she came out and i remembered you're going to spend the rest of your career editing martin luther king's papers and you turned it down and i think she was a little bit wiser than i was at that point of recog
in atlanta, the papers and so many different places, hundreds of archives around the world. i found papers in india. we bring them all together and decide how to publish them and make them available to people. that's been my job for the last 25 years. >> host: do ra history and african-american, i can see your interest. what really brought you to want to do this? his wife asked you, but what was your motivation for wanting to do it? >> guest: i had a lot of doubts when she called and asked because i didn't know if i wanted to devote the rest of my career to doing this. >> host: how did she ask you? >> guest: she asked me if i would be interested in and when we first talked on that phone call i said are in their other people that have done more work really on the grassroots dimension of the struggle, not so much on the role. i've never really written very much about came apart from the movement. so, but then she came out and i remembered my wife and i do want to spend the rest of your career you could have been editor of the papers, but we turned it down, and i think she was a little bit wi
-- and he beats the atlanta falcons in the championship game with his arms, not his legs. so you're the ravens and you say what are we going to see kaepernick the runner? kaepernick the passer? some sort of hybrid guy who who's between? that's why there's so many interesting storylines in this game revolving not just around the people but the strategy. >> rose: there's also the story of both quarter backs, not only caber nick but flacco. >> rose: >> joe flacco is an amazing story from the standpoint that no one h ever called him a premier quarterback since the day he walked into the n.f.l. a half decade ago. he's got more wins than any quarter back in football. and so you say how has this happened? he's got a great support system and he's had a good defense and he has a good runningback in ray rice. but, charlie, i've covered this guy a lot over the last five years and i'm convinced that one of the things that makes him so good is that he just doesn't care. i walked off the field with him in denver after he had this thrilling, scintillating, incredible double overtime win over th
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